ALSTON DANCE

22 November 2010

I[Picture of Alston ad in The List] have sadly been unable to see much dance since the children came along. We just couldn’t get baby-sitters and all the organising required to “get up off our assess” and go along to see Richard Alston’s latest on the 12th. That’s such a shame, as the blurb made it sound really fascinating.

The last 18 months have been eventful ones for Richard Alston, Britain’s most musical choreographer.

In addition to directing Rich ard Alston Dance Company, he made a critically acclaimed Carmen for Scottish Ballet, and was appointed Chair of Youth Dance England. 2010 began with a four-week tour of the US, including RADC’s third, sell-out New York season.

For its November performance at the Festival Theatre, Alston will be creating brand new work and reviving his iconic Light Flooding Into Darkened Rooms.

Light Flooding Into Darkened Rooms deals with privacy, with a delicacy of feeling masked by a formal façade of propriety and gracious behaviour.

It is danced to lute pieces by the Baroque master Denis Gaultier – in the 17th century, a music lesson could act as the polite cover for stolen moments of intimacy.

Also featured is complementary music for mandolin by the Japanese composer Jo Kondo.

All the music is performed live.

I simply love baroque, and most of my “classical” collection is Bach and Handel. I also would like to hear some modern mandolin from a Japanese composer — wonder what THAT would be like. It is great that Alston uses live music as all-too-often contemporary dance is down to recorded, pre-recorded or mixed stuff.  This would make the whole thing gel in its context and could make for a really unique and engaging night.

[Picture of dancers from Alston Dance]Also…  I LOVE this picture. It really is a superb photograph in all respects, please take time to enjoy it for what it is.  It is credited to Chris Nash the famous dance photographer from London.

I cut the ad from “The List” magazine — it is this picture, full-page, but with text (see top right of this post), for some reason I actually prefer the ad’s proportion and the text.

I have a soft spot for old advertising signs and pictures, and I reckon this would be a modern version.  I’m thinking of framing it!

§

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: